Tū Pono seeks local response to keeping whānau free from harm

The Tū Pono network is engaging with whānau across the South Island to implement a Whānau Ora approach to address family violence and harm. Tomorrow night they will facilitate a hui in Blenheim with a focus on ‘Punanga Haumaru’ which translates as ‘creating safe spaces in our homes, marae and community’.

Keynote speakers at the hui include Hon Dame Tariana Turia, Tā Mark Solomon and Helen Leahy, Pouārahi / Chief Executive of Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu. 

The hui builds on a background of fourteen previous hui in 2016-17 in which whānau from across the South Island came together to share strategies and create a model for taking action in their own homes: Tu Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whānau.   At the hui at Te Hora Pa on 11 May 2017, participants described Tu Pono as the Te Waipounamu strategy to effect change.   The feedback hui are designed to help facilitate the change process.

Helen says that “Research shows us that cultural mis-understandings, systemic bias, and lack of knowledge about whānau dynamics and values prevents some Māori, including those in serious need, from engaging with mainstream agencies”.

“Tū Pono seeks to address gaps within the current system for addressing family violence by working to enable a stronger whānau response” says Helen.  “The best solutions tend to be those that are locally owned and driven”.

As the Whānau Ora commissioning agency for the South Island, Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu is supporting the Tū Pono approach so that whānau can apply strategies for change to end the impact of violence in their own lifetime.

The hui will be held at Omaka Marae, from 3.30-8pm in Blenheim and is open to the Marlborough community to attend.

Tomorrow night they will facilitate a hui in Blenheim with a focus on ‘Punanga Haumaru’ which translates as ‘creating safe spaces in our homes, marae and community’.

Keynote speakers at the hui include Hon Dame Tariana Turia, Tā Mark Solomon and Helen Leahy, Pouārahi / Chief Executive of Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu. 

The hui builds on a background of fourteen previous hui in 2016-17 in which whānau from across the South Island came together to share strategies and create a model for taking action in their own homes: Tu Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whānau.   At the hui at Te Hora Pa on 11 May 2017, participants described Tu Pono as the Te Waipounamu strategy to effect change.   The feedback hui are designed to help facilitate the change process.

Helen says that “Research shows us that cultural mis-understandings, systemic bias, and lack of knowledge about whānau dynamics and values prevents some Māori, including those in serious need, from engaging with mainstream agencies”.

“Tū Pono seeks to address gaps within the current system for addressing family violence by working to enable a stronger whānau response” says Helen.  “The best solutions tend to be those that are locally owned and driven”.

As the Whānau Ora commissioning agency for the South Island, Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu is supporting the Tū Pono approach so that whānau can apply strategies for change to end the impact of violence in their own lifetime.

The hui will be held at Omaka Marae, from 3.30-8pm in Blenheim and is open to the Marlborough community to attend.

ranae nivenComment