The hungry caterpillar, the incubator and the Medal of Honour

Transformation through Innovation

The late composer and musician, Hirini Melbourne, wrote a beautiful waiata Pūrerehua, which is frequently heard sung in our kōhanga and our home.

Pürerehua rere runga hau, Papaki parirau, Rere runga hau;

(Ka piki, ka piki Runga rawa e  Papaki parirau rere runga hau

Ka tau, ka tau Runga püäwai  Ka whänauhua  A pūrerehua

Ka tahi, ka rua  Ka toru, ka wha Ka rü, ka rë  Ka puta e whä whë

 

Butterfly carried on the wind, fluttering its wings on the wind, up and up, way up high, fluttering its wings on the wind.   It lands, it lands, on a flower to lay its eggs, this butterfly.  One, two, three, four, they shake and quiver; out pops four caterpillars.

 

It was a song that inspired me as I attended the Social Services Providers Aotearoa conference in Christchurch on Friday 28 October.   The theme of the conference, was Taking Charge of Change: Transformation through Innovation.   The pūrerehua represents a classic model of transformation – starting as a chrysalis, merging into the hungry caterpillar and evolving into a dazzling butterfly.   It reminds me of the journey of so many of our whānau and our whānau entities.   Their initiative starts with a great idea – they then seek to learn, acquire new knowledge, venture out into new partnerships, collaborate, integrate, facilitate a whole new way of working – and then eventually their work is demonstrated in the success of their work, making a difference for the whanau with whom they work.

 

Te Pāpori Whakatere: Incubator Agenda

This week we saw some of our entities coming together for two days, for the Accelerator Programme: one of the initiatives in capacity building we have going at Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu.

 

Participants from Bros for Change; Soul Full Superfoods; Waka Whenua; Hikoi Waewae; Puha Pesto; Yoga in Schools, Hale Compound Conditioning; Te Ngakau Pono and Neats Treats came together to work with coaches, Westpac Banking gurus; and the team from Tu Maia to work on the business.   That is the business of budgeting spending, due diligence on costings, money managing systems, financial sustainability, strategic plans, cashflow budgets, multiyear budgets and even some expert advice from the team at IRD.

 

 
  Jaye Pukepuke (Bros for Change) with Westpac Banker, Craig Baker.

Jaye Pukepuke (Bros for Change) with Westpac Banker, Craig Baker.

 

A highlight for some of the team was to have a 7am power breakfast with Sir Ray Avery, former New Zealander of the Year and a very inspiring entrepreneur.

 

  Participants from Te Pāpori o Whakatere with Sir Ray Avery at breakfast at the Hagley Atrium

Participants from Te Pāpori o Whakatere with Sir Ray Avery at breakfast at the Hagley Atrium

 

Help for the Homeless

A highlight for this week was signing the contract between Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu and Help for the Homeless for a Whānau Ora Navigator.   The mahi of this committed team of volunteers is so inspirational.   They work tirelessly to support whānau and individuals in times of need, to move into accommodation, employment, education and training.   Help for the Homeless are on a continual learning path with regards to te reo me ōna tikanga and is mindful of engaging with whānau from a culturally responsive perspective, especially with our  homeless kaumātua who are in a position of vulnerability.    We wish Help for the Homeless and all the whānau associated all the best in their ongoing journey towards ‘ora’.

 

  Alice Matheson (L) and Rongo Baker ( R) from Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu with Amy Burke and Tania Mulvaney from Help for the Homeless after signing their contract on Friday.

Alice Matheson (L) and Rongo Baker ( R) from Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu with Amy Burke and Tania Mulvaney from Help for the Homeless after signing their contract on Friday.

 
 
  Amy and Tania: Champions of Hope    

Amy and Tania: Champions of Hope

 

 

Ending Domestic and Family Violence Summit

It was an honour to attend the Summit in Wellington this week and particularly to hear the keynote address from Ta Mark Solomon, Addressing Family harm through a Campaign of Whanau Engagement.  From the start of his korero, Ta Mark set the scene:

“To end the violence, we need to break the silence, to speak out, to eliminate opportunities for violence to occur, to create situations for liberation – try new approaches, build sustainable, mana-enhancing relationships”.

 

  Ta Mark shared with the wider group, the background and approach modelled in Tu Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whanau.

Ta Mark shared with the wider group, the background and approach modelled in Tu Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whanau.


Earlier this year, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu came together with Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu – the Whānau Ora Commissioning Agency in the South Island; Te Puna Oranga and Te Whare Hauora – two kaupapa Maori providers in the family violence sector.   We had had enough.    The focus was to enable a stronger Māori response to family violence by asserting the whānau voice as a fundamental key to reduce and eliminate harm.  

Rather than being defined in our own sphere of influence – as iwi; as services; as Whānau Ora – we chose to come together under one korowai – one cloak of understanding that we could all wear.   We called ourselves Tu Pono: Te Mana Kaha o te Whanau.   Tu Pono literally means to stand in one’s truth – to hold the faith.  

Between June and July, over 400 whānau members attended community conversations in hui at Rehua Marae (Christchurch), Morven, Invercargill, Dunedin, Hokitika and Blenheim.   An advisory group was established to provide guidance and support, a Whānau Response model developed and a legacy is being created to ensure the data and voices of whānau inform next steps.

It wasn’t rocket science.   But in the words of the people we had the recipe for hope that we need to know, if we are to create long-lasting enduring solutions.   We were told the “Healing journey begins with whānau”; “we need to give our children a voice to say no”; “We need zero tolerance for violence on our marae”.  The answers were in their own words: “It’s about being reconnected; “Silence allows further violence”; “Whānau need to be our starting point”.    Ta Mark Solomon


  Great to meet up with old friends at the Summit: Liz Marsden, Ariana Simpson and Alva Pomare

Great to meet up with old friends at the Summit: Liz Marsden, Ariana Simpson and Alva Pomare

Introducing Norman Dewes, MNZM

 

Last week our Board Chair, Norm Dewes, was honoured by new Governor General, Dame Patsy Reddy, with the 90th Birthday Queen’s Honours, as a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for a lifetime of services to his people.   A well deserved honour which we are all so proud to celebrate.

Global Outcomes : Results Based Accountability

How proud were we to have Maania Farrar representing Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu and Alison Bourn from Te Puawaitanga ki Otautahi Trust, representing us at the Global outcomes conference in Belfast, Ireland.  The presentations from the keynotes and workshops are now available online at the following link

 

 

  Maania and Alison shared our experiences with an international audience in their session, entitled ‘Best Start in Life: Early Intervention and Turning Curves for Children and Young People’.

Maania and Alison shared our experiences with an international audience in their session, entitled ‘Best Start in Life: Early Intervention and Turning Curves for Children and Young People’.

 

You might also be interested in looking at the Northern Ireland Executive’s Programme for Government that can be found at the following link: 

A particular highlight for Maania and Alison was to spend time talking with the RBA champion of the world: Mark Friedman.

 

 

 
 

 

Ending the Week in Style – Te Tau Ihu o Te Waka a Maui

There could be no better way to finish the week than to be in Nelson at the Te Waipounamu kapa haka competitions hosted at Nayland College.   Nineteen groups are represented in the three categories; juniors, intermediates and seniors with more than 500 performers on the stage throughout the day.      See you there!!!

  Tuia te Matangi in action

Tuia te Matangi in action

Luke Egan1 Comment