If you know who you are and where you are from, then you will know where you are going.

This week started off in the beautiful paradisal setting of Koukourārata for the scholarship presentation ceremony for Whenua Kura.  Whenua Kura is open to all Māori, with scholarships available for those aged 16-40. It is a learning partnership between Te Tapuae o Rehua, Ngāi Tahu Farming and Lincoln University, which seeks to grow Māori leadership in agriculture.   


Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu has been proud to support Whenua Kura; our investment has been focused on the context of whanaungatanga, the application of ‘pastoral care’ to enable whānau members to return to the land and so in a way that strengthen both the land and the people, tangata whenua – the people of the land.

As we walked on to the marae, Tūtehuarewa, the passion of the wero, the strength of the haka pōwhiri, the pride that beat in the hearts of those who welcomed us was evident to all.

There is nothing as inspiring as seeing tauira who know that they have a place in their world, that their future is assured because of their confidence in their own abilities.  (You can read my speech here).  

There is a whakatauaki which says, Inā kei te mohio koe ko wai koe, I anga mai koe i hea, kei te mohio koe. Kei te anga atu ki hea”.  If you know who you are and where you are from, then you will know where you are going. Whenua Kura epitomizes that sense of strength and positive power that is associated with an intimate knowledge of connection, of identity, of belonging.   

The 46 tauira were presented with their scholarships and certificates to a capacity crowd gathered within the whare, including the distinguished honour of two Tā – Tā Mark Solomon and Tā Tipene O’Regan.  It is only right that our future leaders are embraced in the spirit of courage which has been associated with the legacy of leadership that has led us to today.

 

A key event is happening in Canvastown this weekend.

 

Kei ngā mana, kei ngā waka, kei ngā karangamaha, tēnei te reo whakatau o Ngāti Kui He iwi Pakohe, He Iwi Karakia.   Kia tae a tīnana mai koutou ki te whakatuwheratanga o Te Wharekai hou, me te whakaaratanga mai o Te Wharepuni me te Whakaruruhau ki runga i Te Pā o te Hora.

On Saturday morning, in the stillness of the dawn, Ngāti Kuia will be heralding the opening of their new wharekai at Te Hora Pā.   The blessing will take place at Te Hora Pā Road in Canvastown; the dawn ceremony and mihi whakatau at 4.30am followed by breakfast; pōwhiri at 11am and hākari at 1.30pm.  For further details waea : 0800 NGATIK.

Last week I mentioned how beautiful it was to witness the signatures of the descendants of Rangitane ki Wairau embedded in the windows and walls of their whare at Ukaipo.   Ngāti Kuia have stored the memories of their historic treaty signing day in photographic form on their website.   Amongst their archives, the significance of 23 October 2010, when Ngati Kuia became the first of the eight top of the south iwi to settle its Treaty of Waitangi claim with the Crown is recorded for all to enjoy.

Ngati Kuia signs a historic deed of settlement to become the first of the eight top of the south iwi to settle its Treaty of Waitangi claim with the Crown

  Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu Taumata member, Gena Moses-Te Kani

Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu Taumata member, Gena Moses-Te Kani

Patua Te Hoe

Te Pūtahitanga now has a beautiful painting, an expression of meaning and beauty created by Priscilla Cowie (Ngāi Tahu, Ngapuhi, Ngāti Kāhu).   Please come in and see this gorgeous art work at our offices in Show Place.   We love all that suggests and all that reveals….you can read more in the artist’s kōrero

 

The term patu is a reference from a karakia that recognises the splash that the paddle makes as it takes its first stroke.  The second line of that karakia continues ‘Rotua te hoe’ : chart your future with magic and hope.

“In my initial drawings, the manaia form was central to what I thought would come out in the hoe.   Within that word manaia it’s about holding mana; but also as a symbol of a guardian, kaitiaki for the whānau here”.  

 

Finally, for all those lining up for the City to Surf in Christchurch on Sunday, good luck.  The Pae Ora City to Surf event has been a collaborative effort between He Waka Tapu Trust; Purapurawhetu, Te Puawaitanga, and Te Ora Hou.  Te Pūtahitanga believes, whole-heartedly in the concept of Pae Ora - an emphasis on healthy lifestyles, and as such we have invested in supporting whānau to participate.   See you at the finishing line!


And couldn’t resist….those who take off with the phone to take their own selfies deserve to be outed!

  Koukourārata locals caught in the act of secret selfies – Manaia Cunningham (Project Manager for Koukourārata Wānanga Taiao) and Gina-Lee Duncan (Contract Advisor for Te Ha o Kawatiri).

Koukourārata locals caught in the act of secret selfies – Manaia Cunningham (Project Manager for Koukourārata Wānanga Taiao) and Gina-Lee Duncan (Contract Advisor for Te Ha o Kawatiri).

Patrick HusseyComment