To live in hearts we leave behind is not to die

Tangi kau ana te ngākau ki ngā mate o te wā, tērā ia te ruahine o Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki me te rangatira o Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi kua riro i te tirohanga kanohi i tēnei wiki tonu, e moe, okioki mai rā.

In this time of Puaka/Matariki, we look to the star, Pohutukawa, who guides those who pass on to the next world, and we reflect on the influence, the inspiration, and the imprint our loved ones leave in our lives.

Hoki mai ki a tātou te hunga ora, mauri ora ki a koutou katoa.

Our week has been overflowing with tears and laughter, pride and sorrow, learning from the young, being inspired by the old.  

It is right, firstly, to acknowledge two key successes profiled in Te Waipounamu this week.

The first is the honouring of Tā Mark Solomon for the difference he has made to New Zealand.  On Thursday night, Tā Mark was awarded a Kea World Class New Zealand Award in recognition of his massive contribution to our international reputation and to the advancement of Aotearoa.   

The second is the acknowledgement of the tireless voluntary commitment extended by Taua Aroha Reriti-Crofts since first joining Te Ropu Wāhine Māori Toku i te Ora o Ōtautahi (Māori Women’s Welfare League Ōtautahi branch) in 1968.   Taua Aroha was selected runner up in the Māori/Pacific Health Volunteer individual award in the 2016 Health Volunteer Awards.   Her passionate promotion of initiatives such as Healthy Day at the Pa; or Kai in the Yard represent her enthusiastic energy for ensuring whānau have access to basic health information.

Ka mau te wehi!

  Aroha Hōhipera Reriti-Crofts, Runner Up in the Māori/Pacific Health Volunteer individual award in the 2016 Health Volunteer Awards

Aroha Hōhipera Reriti-Crofts, Runner Up in the Māori/Pacific Health Volunteer individual award in the 2016 Health Volunteer Awards

Work Inspiration with a Whānau Edge

This week, the students from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi and Te Pa o Rakaihautu in Christchurch, were part of a pilot project jointly led by Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu and the Mātauranga team of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, in conjunction with Careers New Zealand.

For us, the Work Inspiration concept is about grooming our next generation for success; providing opportunities to put them in touch with the incredible diversity of initiatives that can shape our career journeys.  There were some real gems shared by the rangatahi.  One young woman, when asked what would be the one thing she would do if she was an iwi chief executive, replied ‘Make Peace’.   Her explanation was that the issues within and between iwi should be our first priority in creating a future we can all be proud of.  With insights like that, tomorrow looks promising!

The three day programme was crammed full of opportunities for our rangatahi to participate in a normal day down on the farm (Whenua Kura), test-driving the technology of Iwinet and Māui Studios, sampling the goodies at Kākano Café, workshopping the role of a Whānau Ora Navigator, or honing their communication skills with Ngāi Tahu Communications and Tahu FM.   We started the three days off at Tuahiwi Marae, within the generosity of the people of Ngāi Tūāhuriri.  

  The rangatahi from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi and Te Pa o Rakaihautu with Chris Eruera (Ngāi Tahu), at Ngāi Tahu Farms, in Eyrewell

The rangatahi from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi and Te Pa o Rakaihautu with Chris Eruera (Ngāi Tahu), at Ngāi Tahu Farms, in Eyrewell

The rangatahi particularly relished the opportunity for working with digital technology.   Interesting in that this week, the Minister for Whānau Ora released a report on Māori in the ICT sector.  A key finding of the Māori me te Ao Hangarau 2015: Māori in the ICT sector report is that Māori, particularly those aged 15-24, are high users of mobile technology to access the internet.  Not surprisingly, the rangatahi loved the VR headset – connected to the virtual world by virtue of the headset that takes you to another space.
 

Southern Bound

Part of our team went South this week, to Dunedin, Invercargill, Lumsden, Tuatapere and Otautau.

The trip included some much valued time with our Whānau Enterprise Coaches, Donna Matahaere-Atariki, Cherry Bertanees and Tracey Pōtiki.   Our coaches work alongside of whānau entities in helping to support their initiatives to move from the planning stage through to implementation.

  Donna Matahaere-Atariki, Cherry Bertanees and Tracey Potiki

Donna Matahaere-Atariki, Cherry Bertanees and Tracey Potiki

There was also an opportunity to meet up with some new supporters of the Whānau Ora approach.  We are currently making contact with the five Social Development providers that the Ministry of Social Development has recommended to us as working in a way which aligns with Whānau Ora.   Those initiatives and entities are:

  • Early Start Project Ltd, Christchurch

  • Methodist Mission, Dunedin

  • Tuatapere Community Worker Support Trust

  • Otautau District and Community Charitable Trust

  • Northern Southland Community Resource Centre

 

This week our team has been out on the road in Invercargill, Dunedin and Christchurch to discuss the possibility of working together with some of these groups.   As a result of the proposed transfer of Social Development funding to Whānau Ora we are developing opportunities for new alliances; forging relationships across the community which enable a broader access to Whānau Ora.

  Vania Pirini with Roseanne Allen (middle) and Sharon Hampton from the Tuatapere team

Vania Pirini with Roseanne Allen (middle) and Sharon Hampton from the Tuatapere team

What’s Up next week?

We continue the series of hui driven by Tū Pono Te Mana Kaha o e Whānau; our conversations generated around addressing the impact of family harm.

 

  • Thursday 23 June, Te Tomairangi Marae, 54 Eye Street, Invercargill.   Start time of 9.30am through to 2.30pm

 

  • Friday 24 June, Arahura Marae Hokitika.   Start-time of 11am through to 3.15pm

 

This week we had the first meeting of our Tū Pono Advisory Group. The group members were nominated for their expertise within the social and health sectors, including the broader context of Whānau Ora.  Members include: Inu Farrar; Karaitiana Tickell; Tim Reriti; Karen Brown; Ariana Wilson; Louise Waho; Peter Daryl; Sheryl Gardyne; Daniel Mataki; Billy Jean; Gwyneth Piwi; Aroha King; Jynine Berryman and Beatrice Brown.
 

New Research Opportunities for Te Waipounamu

Some fantastic success was announced in the range of research opportunities by the Health Research Council.  Three recipients from the University of Otago were awarded substantial research grants, as follows:

DON’T MISS OUT: 7-8 July 2016 is our inaugural Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu symposium…..

If you're interested in attending please register here.