In growing kai we are also growing Whānau

30th June 2016

The financial reporting year starts on 1 July and ends 30 June.   It’s the time of year when all the reports start flooding in, the stories and narratives telling us of the amazing progress we are observing right across Te Waipounamu.

One report that really showed the remarkable efforts that whānau go to, in doing whatever it takes to achieve the goals they have set for themselves.   This is the story of Te Kākano Maara Kai at Araiteuru Marae in Dunedin.

“We believe that we have created a sustainable Maara Kai at Araiteuru Marae. The Maara Kai serves the needs of the engaged whānau and the wider marae community.  The Maara Kai has led to strong relationship between the “hard to reach” community represented within the project and Araiteuru Marae. This relationship has led to a number of other related kaupapa to be undertaken by both communities.  In growing kai we are also growing Whānau”

 

The learnings are fascinating.   “Expect the unexpected, be transparent in all dealings and become innovative”.    The project revealed that self-determination is important for the community we work with, and that identifiable leaders with support and knowledge have “stepped-up”.     Whānau involved in Te Kākano Maara Kai acknowledged that while most were in employment, most of it was low wage and there was a desire to increase the income levels, to explore other options.   And for those in the political arena, who just won’t believe that Whānau Ora is working until they see the numbers, try these for size:

5 Hui with Te Putahitanga, 120 hours in preparing our application, 1 Skype meeting with Assessment Panel, 1 RBA Seminar attended, 10 Whānau Recruited, 950 hours of Whanau time invested in maara kai, 120 hours community work completed, 23 Maara Kai days (every Sunday with Whānau since the start of the project), 3 Meetings with Araiteuru Chairperson, 2 Presentations to Araiteuru Marae Council, 1 focus group Hui, 12 Whānau attended, 3 Days spent tidying up the gardens and grounds of Araiteuru Marae, 2 Health Hui, 48 Whānau members, 1 Te Kakano Maara Kai supported Touch Tournament, 400 attendees, 2 Nurse led Clinics, 10 interventions 1 Presentation to Agencies for Nutritional Action, 80 attendees, 1 Meeting with Mitre 10 Mega, $200 worth of plants gifted, 2 Meetings with the Shetland Street Community Gardens Co-ordinator, 8 Meetings of the Project Steering Group, 9 Gardens built, 4 more planned, 4 Harvests from the Maara Kai, 30 whanau feed, 2 Hosting of Redeemed Christian Motorcycle Club, 6 meetings with Te Putahitanga Coach 3 Meetings with TPK Business Facilitation Manager and Business Coach 1visit to North East Valley Community Garden, Te Whare Koa in Oamaru and Whitestone Kitchen Garden to gain inspiration and ideas.

Number crunching and information analysis

This week we welcome two bright young men within our midst.

Ben Reriti-Jones of Ngāi Tūāhuriri, has been appointed to the role of Information Analyst.  Ben has had prior experience in working for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu (as a Housing Project Manager) and in roles associated with information analysis and business development for He Oranga Pounamu, as well as a project management role for AECOM New Zealand Ltd.   Ben comes to us with a Bachelor of Commerce (major in accounting) and a particular passion for financial management, forecasting and scrutiny of performance.   

Sean Bragg is an aspiring Ngāi Tahu youth, not long out of high school but having already acquired a range of work experience. Sean comes to us from Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu where he is undertaking a unique/new internship. Motopohue (Bluff) is home for Sean and he has strong ties to the deep south.


Only Six Sleeps to go!

Te Aho Mutunga Kore : The Eternal Thread is the theme for this first symposium of Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu.  Held next Thursday 7th and Friday 8th July, it is going to packed full of innovation, inspiration and celebration – showcasing our initiatives, as well as being stimulated by some amazing speakers.

Take for example, Robert Hollis.

Robett Hollis was previously a professional snowboarder ranked 2nd in the world.  Founder of Aranui Ventures which now owns several media interests including FRONTSIDE, a Video Production Partner for clients like Air New Zealand, Veuve Clicquot and Heineken, an App development arm AIRTIME, New Zealand’s Largest Action Sports Network complete with its own half hour TV show, and as a passion project he also created ColabNZ, a shared workspace aimed to help like-minded entrepreneurs and start-up businesses, which has now expanded to 9 floors in 7 buildings in Auckland’s CBD.

Te Kura Whakapumau take to the stage

Waitaha Ngā Manu Kōrero

While we are on the topic of amazing speakers, it was a privilege to be a judge at Ngā Manu Kōrero ki Waitaha 2016 at Te Iringa o Kahukura, Cashmere High School in Christchurch. 

The young people that took to the atamira spoke with passion and principle on the set topics: ‘When I learn te reo Māori, I learn about me”; “time waits for no-one”; “future-focused ancestrally driven.   You can’t help thinking the future is in great hands when you hear our rangatahi talk about their pride in being Māori, their love of the language, their challenges to learn about who they are, even if they have not been ‘brought up ‘Māori’.   A great day of inspiration and hope for tomorrow.

 Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi : winner of Te Ao Marama Fraser Memorial trophy for Junior Māori (Rawhiti Ihaka); Mihi Winiata Trophy for Junior English (Sir Turi Carroll) and Te Paepae Kākā Trophy for the school that earns the highest aggregate.

Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Whānau Tahi : winner of Te Ao Marama Fraser Memorial trophy for Junior Māori (Rawhiti Ihaka); Mihi Winiata Trophy for Junior English (Sir Turi Carroll) and Te Paepae Kākā Trophy for the school that earns the highest aggregate.

Integrated Safety Response

Friday 1st July signalled the launching of a new pilot in Christchurch to make sure families experiencing violence get the help they need from family violence services. 

The pilot will see core agencies closely working together to support victims – Police, CYF, Corrections, Health, specialist family violence NGOs and kaupapa Māori services will work as a team.  A key feature is the identification of ‘high risk’ victims and an independent family violence specialist to support these victims to reduce the risk of further violence.   The new approach has a family/whānau focus – it aims to assess and support the whole family’s needs. And that’s where Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu comes in.   We have spent the last two months preparing for the pilot through our campaign, Tū Pono: te Mana Kaha o te Whānau.

  Tū Pono in the House: Practitioner Wai Gage, with Director Ariana Mataki-Wilson; National Integrated Safety Response Director Superintendent Tusha Penny and Practitioner Carole Frost.

Tū Pono in the House: Practitioner Wai Gage, with Director Ariana Mataki-Wilson; National Integrated Safety Response Director Superintendent Tusha Penny and Practitioner Carole Frost.

Tā Mark was invited to speak at the launch, to speak of his experience in urging whānau to come together, to have the conversations and to speak up and out about addressing family harm.

Finally, I wanted to share this beautiful photo that Marg Henry took when we went to Waihao (Morven) for one of the Tū Pono family violence hui.   We were back in Arowhenua this week, at a hui in Temuka called to share and update whānau with progress in the different achievements and stories of Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu.   It was wonderful to spend time with the people of Waihao, Arowhenua and Moeraki.