The understanding of whakapapa and tikanga is shared

There is nothing that represents the exuberance of our tamariki mokopuna as a day exploring the wonder of Te Kaihinaki – the mighty Moeraki Boulders.   The Moeraki Boulders are our natural taonga that grace a stretch of Koekohe Beach on the Otago Coast.  This week I had the pleasure of listening to some interviews undertaken by Nola Tipa with some of the whānau who are taking part in an initiative Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu is supporting, Te Whakapiki Wairua.

Te Whakapiki Wairua is about inspiring whānau to reconnect with the marae and their whānau roots. The understanding of whakapapa and tikanga is shared in wānanga around waiata, karanga, vocabulary, a visit to Kaiapoi Pa, a chance to be together.

2015 saw the first ever whānau initiated Kura Reo with 40 whānau members in attendance.  There were whānau of three and four generations that gathered.  The stories in the interviews absolutely answer that question we ask of ourselves, “is anyone better off?”

  • “It is awe-inspiring, how much our moko loved being there with the other tamariki.   This was the first time my son and moko had stayed on a marae, let alone OUR marae”.

  • “I like it because I get to learn the family history”

  • “One of the things that I have noticed is that around whananaungatanga  - they are connecting now – they knew of each other before, but they didn’t really know each other”

 

As we come towards the end of the school holidays I am hopeful that your days have been full of joyful memories as our children remind us that not only is laughter the best medicine, to recharge the batteries and feed the soul, it is also ‘the sun that drives winter from the human face”.

 

Of course, having a great time is not only the prerogative of the young, as these photos from the Kaumātua Fun Day at Murihiku Marae on Tuesday 19th July show us.

 

Ngā Kete Mātauranga Pounamu Charitable Trust in Invercargill brought together an incredible array of ways to enjoy the day – creative writing, weaving, waiata, painting, ‘meet the GP’, ukulele playing and of course everyone feels better with some pretty nails!


 

Our team has been everywhere this week – Dunedin, Invercargill, Hokitika, and a wonderful day with Te Iwi Pakohe, in the land of Ngāti Kuia.   A full house came to Te Hora Marae, at Canvastown in the region of Marlborough, to share stories, strategies and solutions around addressing family violence.


 

  The beauty that is Te Hora Pa, the ancestral home of Ngāti Kuia

The beauty that is Te Hora Pa, the ancestral home of Ngāti Kuia

 

The whare was positively overflowing with imagination and insight as the people volunteered so many possibilities about how to make the difference we need

 

  • Make our maraes not only drug and alcohol free but violence free

  • Know who our kids are going out with – and their technology

  • Promote behaviours that are caught, not taught

  • Don’t vilify our tāne

  • Encourage courage; be strong enough to say that’s not right

  • It’s not about saving the world; it’s about saving your own world first; be brave enough to challenge your own families;

  • Valuing our kuia and koroua – our natural counsellors

 

  A full house from across Te Tau Ihu to come together for the cause of Tū Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whānau

A full house from across Te Tau Ihu to come together for the cause of Tū Pono: Te Mana Kaha o Te Whānau

 

There was hardly a dry eye in the house as one brave young woman talked about four generations being wiped out in a single day; or when a Nanny talked about being determined to go home that night and talk with her son and daughter, about alcohol and its impact on behaviours.

 

We finish up our hui next week, on Tuesday 26 July, at the Scenic Hotel in Dunedin.

 

  The kaitiaki of Whakatū Marae, Carol Hippolite, with Ariana Ngaruhe and Dame Tariana.

The kaitiaki of Whakatū Marae, Carol Hippolite, with Ariana Ngaruhe and Dame Tariana.

 

District Health Board 2015 Māori Health Profiles now in te reo Māori

 

Snapshots of Māori health in our DHBs are now available in te reo Māori as well as in English.  The 2015 Māori Health Profiles were researched and compiled by Te Rōpū Rangahau Hauora a Eru Pōmare, at the University of Otago, Wellington.

The 20 profiles include indicators of whānau wellbeing, housing and income, health service use and health status. They are publicly available and can be used by any individual or organisation with an interest in hauora Māori. 

 

Read more and links to reports: www.otago.ac.nz/MHP2015

 

What’s Coming Up Next Week

 

  • Saturday 23 July, Te Kōhanga Reo o Whānau Paki, Dunedin :  The launching of their Mahinga Kai kaupapa which is one of our Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu initiatives.   The launch will start at 10.30am and finish with lunch in the school hall.   Have a great day everyone….

  • Sunday 24 July, 11am at Te Rau Aroha Marae, Bluff : creative workshop with rangatahi and Māui Studios (Awarua Research and Development)

  • Monday 25 July, 6.30pm, the first ever Awarua Community Driven hui (Awarua Research and Development)

  • Tuesday 26 July, 11am; Scenic Hotel, Dunedin; Tū Pono – Te Mana Kaha o Whānau

 
 

Te Rau Aroha, Bluff

Luke EganComment