So said Dan Flynn, 2014 Victorian Young Australian of the Year; social entrepreneur and keynote speaker at the Festival For the Future last weekend in Auckland.   At the age of 19 Dan and his mates had a crazy idea, “what if you could create a water bottle company that helped to fund clean water and sanitation in the places that needed it most”?.  Thankyou Water is a social enterprise that empowers Australians to change the world through simple everyday purchases.   Dan and the team have developed 34 consumer products which help to fund safe water access, hygiene, sanitation and food programmes across the world.

Moments anchor you for life.  They help drive the passion and create the reason that makes each day part of the Great Plan.   

Haydon Richards, Rongo Baker, Ben Reriti-Jones, Keefe Robinson-Gore and Sean Bragg with James Nokise, Samoan/Welsh award winning comedian.

Haydon Richards, Rongo Baker, Ben Reriti-Jones, Keefe Robinson-Gore and Sean Bragg with James Nokise, Samoan/Welsh award winning comedian.

Last weekend a crew from the South flew North, to be part of a weekend of design thinking, innovation and future focus.   They returned with a fact-file of useful items of interest.   Did you know 47% of all jobs will no longer be there in twenty years’ time?  Or that the greatest under-utilised force in education is a parent’s love for their children?


If Festival for the Future wasn’t enough to make one envious, last weekend’s social media was rippling with photos of sumptuous banquets from Omaka Marae.

Ngati Apa ki te Ra To held a Tuia te tangata weekend on 24-25 September.   There’s some pretty exciting things happening up that way.   Ngati Apa ki te Ra To wanted their AGM to be a moment that mattered.   They kicked off with a whanau day at the indoor sports centre; hākari that night at Omaka Marae, and then the next day everyone was primed for a full day to focus on the business of the iwi.


Just across the top of the South, other discussions have been having motivated by a focus on Wave Five Investments.   We have shifted the due date back to 14 October as we have been approached by so many whanau who want to shared their bright ideas with us.   Ideas like a Hahi Whanau Ora; path planning support for whānau; Awa Ora; relationships; hauora resources.

Whanau buzzing with enthusiasm in Whakatu  

Whanau buzzing with enthusiasm in Whakatu

 

At the other end of Te Waipounamu, our Whānau Enterprise Coaches have been also in an exciting space, responding to interest from whānau in Queenstown, Arrowtown, Wanaka.   Whānau have been writing applications, raising questions, sharing their visions, thinking about the feasibility of the plans they have for their future.   Some of the conversations are occurring at the Runaka level; other hui taking place in high schools, around the kitchen table.

It was Einstein who said ‘we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them’.  Whānau Ora is a direct response to that frame of thinking – we don’t want more of the same.   We know that whanau-driven; locally-owned; kaupapa based is all the recipe we need to create new solutions for tomorrow.


When we think about great moments to anchor us, an incredibly exciting date is literally on the horizons: the Social Enterprise World Forum, 27-29 September 2017 in Christchurch.

The theme for the World Forum is Ka Koroki te Manu : literally the dawn chorus of birds.

It’s a theme that plucks at my heart.  Our eldest daughter turns 18 this week, and I have been reliving the days in October 1998, when as the dawn swept across the sky, a symphony of birdsong heralded her birth into this world.   Spring always revitalises me;  the puffs of blossom that celebrate the season; the splash of colour that stands tall in a bed of tulips; the jaunty leaps of lambs in the sun.   All of the elements come together in a festival to life.

A good friend asked me last week to think about what is it that makes my heart sing.   Without taking a breath I know it is the greatest gift I have been given, our children.   Being a mother is by far the most overwhelming, terrifying and yet all-absorbing shape to my life.   It requires I be innovative; that I never take for granted the views I have to make meaning by; it demands I be alert to danger; watch every shadow, look for every glimpse of light.

 

That’s the type of courage this concept, Ka Koroki te Manu, conveys to me.  That we look differently at the world around us; thinking how we can make each bolder, stronger, better.   The website is now live - check it out: http://www.sewf2017.org.  

This is the photo of the New Zealand Delegation who went to Hong Kong to announce the theme, the city and the dates of the World Social Enterprise Forum in 2017.   You might recognise a few faces – Anake Goodall from Akina Foundation; Puamiria Parata-Goodall; Levi Armstrong from Patu Aotearoa to name a few.  

This is the photo of the New Zealand Delegation who went to Hong Kong to announce the theme, the city and the dates of the World Social Enterprise Forum in 2017.   You might recognise a few faces – Anake Goodall from Akina Foundation; Puamiria Parata-Goodall; Levi Armstrong from Patu Aotearoa to name a few.

 

It was great to see this week, a move by iwi radio joining in the ‘E Tu Whānau campaign’ to take a stand against violence. E Tu Whānau is a movement for positive change, it’s about taking responsibility and action; supporting whānau to thrive.

Go to our website, http://tahufm.com/e-tu-whanau-take-a-stand-against-violence-sign-the-charter-of-commitment/to read more and sign the charter.

 

Coming up in the next couple of weeks are some events you might be interested in attending

  • This Saturday 1 October; at Kakano Café and Cookery School, 11.30am-1pm; 100 Peterborough Street Christchurch.   Samoan Auckland based artist, Lana Lopesi, will be discussing her current exhibition, Seki, and ongoing research related to food sovereignty.
  • Wednesday 12 October: Ministry of Health NGO Health and Disability sector national forum; Westpac Stadium Wellington.   8.30am-4pm.   The five key themes are: one team; closer to home; start system; people powered; value and high performance.  

  • Thursday 13 October : He kai kei aku ringa; The Crown Maori Economic Growth Partnership; Show Gate Venue, Riccarton Park, Christchurch.

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