Cutting through the wire

Outside HCC premises, I was taken bey the revolutionary sight of a broken barbed wire fence.  


To be more specific, my eyes were drawn to the dawn breaking through; refusing to be reined in by angry barbs or corrugated iron.  That space which opened up the horizons; the wonder of a jet black sky.

The Native American people had a term for the barbed wire that cut up their homes and landscapes; the marker of a colonizing project which sought to replace communal living with individual private property ownership.   They called it the ‘devil’s rope’.

Sometimes our perspective is so focused on the fence wire and the thorns, the barriers that serve to constrain and restrict us, that we are oblivious to the horizon of possibility that we are immersed in.  It is akin to the concept of Whānau Ora as Wonder Ora – stirring a restless hunger in us all, to reconnect, to rekindle the flame of faith in our families as the source of so much potential.

Oranga Whānau, Oranga Marae

 
The Prime Minister, Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern and Minister for Māori Development, Hon Nanaia Mahuta, with newest minister, Hon Poto Williams, Minister for Community and Voluntary Sector.

The Prime Minister, Rt Hon Jacinda Ardern and Minister for Māori Development, Hon Nanaia Mahuta, with newest minister, Hon Poto Williams, Minister for Community and Voluntary Sector.

 

It was exciting to be at Rehua Marae this week for the relaunching of Oranga Marae.

Oranga Marae delivers support, advice and investment for marae. This support may include building projects and activities to revitalise cultural knowledge.  A key goal of Oranga Marae is to strengthen the ability of marae to pass on their ancestral knowledge of whaikōrero, karanga and local mātauranga, tikanga and kawa to descendants.    Oranga Marae supports these outcomes:

  • marae are safe and healthy, contributing to the well-being of iwi, hapū and whānau

  • people are engaged on the marae and an increasing number of events and activities are held to ensure the transmission of mātauranga Māori

  • marae increasingly contribute to the revitalisation of te reo and tikanga Māori

  • whānau work together to develop the marae

Oranga Marae is provided by Te Puni Kōkiri and the Department of Internal Affairs. It replaces the Lottery Marae Heritage and Facilities Fund which has permanently closed.

If you are looking for ways to develop your marae or your whānau and hapū, 

Free phone:  0800 824 824

Email:  oranga.marae@dia.govt.nz

https://www.tpk.govt.nz/en/whakamahia/oranga-marae

Applications for marae development planning and technical/feasibility study support are usually made weekly. Applications need to be submitted before 5pm Wednesday to be considered the following week. Marae will be advised of the decision within three weeks of application.

Applications for cultural development activities and capital works are made quarterly (usually in March, June, September and December). Exact dates of decision meetings will be advised closer to the time. Marae will be advised of the decision within two weeks of the committee meeting.

 
Rehua Kaumātua, Ruawhitu Pokaia

Rehua Kaumātua, Ruawhitu Pokaia

Taumata representative, Jo McLean, with Te Tai Tonga MP, Rino Tirikatene-Sullivan

Taumata representative, Jo McLean, with Te Tai Tonga MP, Rino Tirikatene-Sullivan

A beautiful shot with our Minister for Whānau Ora, Hon Peeni Henare

A beautiful shot with our Minister for Whānau Ora, Hon Peeni Henare

Prime Minister, Minister Mahuta and Keri Limmer, Te Puni Kokiri

Prime Minister, Minister Mahuta and Keri Limmer, Te Puni Kokiri

 

Kotahi te Aroha, Kotahi te Whanau, Stronger together

The last of the series of four wānanga focused on rangatahi wellness, Maranga Mai Te Waipounamu, took place in Ōtepoti last Sunday.   Have a look at their facebook page to catch up on https://www.facebook.com/MarangaMaiTW/.


It is all about connection, all about kōrero, all about staying and living well.

 
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“Progress comes from celebrating difference and never from building walls. “It’s about building bridges and strengthening communities.” Maranga Mai Te Wai Pounamu

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Ka nui te huka, ka patua te kaha o ngā mea katoa i konei


As we welcome in the intense cold of winter frost, snow and winds, we are encouraging our whānau to draw closely together, to feel the warmth of the energy of collective strength.

This week, we experienced the power of the collective through welcoming three new staff into our midst.

 
Our refreshed team: Huata Martindale; Marg Henry; Sam Selwyn; Edwardene Tanaki and Jason Lee (financial controller)

Our refreshed team: Huata Martindale; Marg Henry; Sam Selwyn; Edwardene Tanaki and Jason Lee (financial controller)

 

Marg Henry has been appointed to the role of Contract advisor (waves).

Marg (Waikato, Ngāi Tahu) has a strong history with many local Whānau Ora entities, including He Waka Tapu, Te Puna Oranga, Te Whare Hauora; and He Oranga Pounamu.   She has also been a key project manager to Te Rau Matatini (Māori mental health).


Huata Martindale (Taranaki) has been appointed to the position of contract advisor (navigation). 

  Huata has served for over twenty years with the New Zealand Police, having successfully gained the diploma in New Zealand policing, as well as qualifications in management, bilingual teaching, and frontline management.   Huata has been teaching the art of mau rākau / taiaha since 1989.   He also has considerable passion for sporting and physical wellbeing.


Edwardene Tanaki (Ngāti Mutunga ki Wharekauri, Tonga) has been awarded the role of contract advisor (Tū Pono Te Mana Kaha o te Whānau” ). 

Edwardene has over twenty years experience in NGOs and community groups.   She has a Bachelor’s degree in social work and a diploma in cultural supervision.    She is currently a Kaitiaki Bicultural supervisor, as well as a social worker for the HELP foundation.


We are also delighted to welcome Sam Selwyn (see previous blog) and Jason Lee (Chinese) to the role of Financial Controller for Te Putahitanga o Te Waipounamu.

Jason is an experienced accountant with experience in leadership, customer service, and sales expertise working in a management role.   He graduated from the University of Canterbury in 2012 with a Bachelor of Commerce (BCom), majoring in Accounting.   Since that time he has been the Financial Accountant in a family run business.

 
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The new staff members with some of their whānau tautoko

EQC Inquiry

 
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This week we had the honour of hosting Dame Silvia Cartwright in Te Whenua Taurikura.   


The Inquiry's purpose is to learn lessons from the Canterbury earthquakes and ensure that the Earthquake Commission has the appropriate policies and operating structures in place to ensure improved claims management experiences in the future.


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Dame Silvia Cartwright was appointed in November 2018 to lead the Public Inquiry into the Earthquake Commission – by the Minister for Greater Christchurch Regeneration, Hon Dr Megan Woods.


Dame Silvia has an awesome presence.   When you see her all those memories of her champion efforts across the decade flow in in East Timor; the Cambodian Tribunal into war crimes; her status as the first female Chief District Court Judge in 1989, and in 1993 the first woman to be appointed as a High Court judge.   And of course her distinguished role as the Governor-General of New Zealand, from 2001 to 2006.


Dame Silvia is renown for her leadership and vision in the Cartwright inquiry into Auckland National Women’s Hospital in the 1980s.   


The biggest change to arise out of the inquiry report was the introduction of a national cervical screening programme, which is now credited with having reduced the cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. Her report led to the medical disciplinary system being overhauled; the creation of the Health and Disability Commissioner system; and the introduction of state-appointed ethics committees to oversee research. The notion of informed consent is now literally a household phrase as a result of that inquiry.

So the possibility of inspiring a seismic shift in attitudes; in creating a new paradigm for how we deal with natural chaos and the role of the Earthquake Commission in providing an adequate and sustainable response could be in no better hands than that of the Dame.

We had a wonderful kōrero, with Whānau Ora Navigators, those involved in education (Kaha Education); research (Ihi Evaluation); and those previously involved with earthquake response and recovery.

Matariki moments

 
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Te Whare Hauora (Refuge) and Lu Lu's Bar and Eatery last week held a very successful Matariki Pay it Forward fundraiser, a Prestigious Auction and Trivia Bingo evening. The fund-raiser, held in Christchurch, was fundraising for vulnerable families experiencing family harm in their homes and our community. The funds raised were to purchase SOS Wristband (Safelets) that can call for help from their guardians. These are for families who are not entitled to financial support through Work and Income.  It looked a great night and our team who attended the event made the rest of us all very envious!

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Matariki in Murihiku

We end this week with some sensational photos from the Matariki celebrations at Murihiku marae hosted by Navigator Tinana  facilitator Heta Nihoniho. 

Up to 120 whanau gathered at the local marae for Matariki parakuihi and another 100 for hangi.   Local kaumatua and  secondary schools came to celebrate and share a delicious breakfast. As the hangi rose, more celebrations were shared on the evening with nga maata waka whānau.

 
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Luke EganComment