A Gem in the Middle of Paradise

We have been so proud this week, to celebrate with Jade and Wiki Temepara, and their five tamariki, the opening of the Kākano Café and Cookery School.

“Jade Temepara grew up in Murihiku/Southland until the age of 18. Here she moved to Otautahi and has been based in the Hakatere and wider Otautahi areas. Over the last 16 years she has raised her tamariki with husband Wiki and has gained an unrelenting passion for her whānau and community. Jade has grown her own food for her whānau for over 10 years and knows how important the skills, food and healing comes with that. In that time she has gained value in learning to grow, save seed, cook, preserve, pickle, raw food and ferment on many levels”.

In 2010 Jade started an organization,  www.handoverahundy.org.nz,  teaching schools, families, young parents homes and anyone she could talk into, growing food.  She has won awards in the Ellerslie International flower show, been a finalist for her work with families, for New Zealander of the year, won the NZ Gardener of the year. In short, there’s nothing this amazing young wahine and her whānau, can’t turn their hands to.

Kākano Café, at 100 Peterborough Street, is a wonderful expression of a whānau in action.  A whānau who love the spirit of kotahitanga : working, eating, playing together.   A whānau committed to a sustainable future : planning for tomorrow by looking after what we eat today.   Focusing on health and wellbeing; on preservation of customary practices; of protection of traditional ways.

  Jade Temepara   (Ngai Tahu, Kati mamoe, Nga Puhi, Ngati Tuwharetoa)

Jade Temepara   (Ngai Tahu, Kati mamoe, Nga Puhi, Ngati Tuwharetoa)

Walking right beside her  are Jade’s immediate whānau; her Pōua Colin who passed down the love of growing ‘heritage seeds’ from those of the generations before.   Kākano Café has had the benefit of Help for the Homeless helping put the garden down; Hales Compound Conditioning, working out in the massive garden boxes at the front of the café.  

  Front of House : Ariana Reihana Ngai Tahu, Kati mamoe, Nga Puhi, Ngati Tuwharetoa

Front of House : Ariana Reihana Ngai Tahu, Kati mamoe, Nga Puhi, Ngati Tuwharetoa

 

Excellence in Māori farming in Te Waipounamu

From the seed of Kākano, to the legacy and skills in Māori farming left by Sir Apirana Ngata, it’s all about the whenua.

Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu is delighted to congratulate three of the four competition finalists in this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy come from Te Waipounamu: Tahu a Tao farm in Rakaia near Ashburton, and the two Ngāi Tahu Farming operations, Te Ahu Pātiki and Maukatere near Oxford in Canterbury.   Ngāi Tahu Farming has a strong involvement with Whenua Kura; an initiative which focuses on growing Māori leadership in agriculture.

As a proud sponsor of Whenua Kura, we in Te Pūtahitanga are really thrilled to see Whenua Kura graduates reaching for the stars.  As part of the process leading up to the announcement of the winner of the prestigious Ahuwhenua Trophy on 20 May, each finalist has a public open field day to showcase their properties.   For Te Ahu Pātiki and Maukatere the big day is 8 March.   Contact Renata.Hakiwai@tetapuae.co.nz for more information.

  Ngāi Tahu Farming staff in Wellington for the announcement of Ahuwhenua finalists. Back row, from left: Ngāi Tahu Farming CEO Andrew Priest, General manager, Ngāi Tahu Farming Dairy, Shane Kelly, Mana Whenua Clare Williams, Stakeholder Engagement Specialist Kim Manahi, Mana Whenua Lik Dawson, Catherine Dawson and baby Taituha, Ngāi Tahu Farming Board Chair Gill Cox. Front row, left, finalist Rod Lamb, Te Ahu Patiki and finalist Hemi Dawson, Maungatere.

Ngāi Tahu Farming staff in Wellington for the announcement of Ahuwhenua finalists. Back row, from left: Ngāi Tahu Farming CEO Andrew Priest, General manager, Ngāi Tahu Farming Dairy, Shane Kelly, Mana Whenua Clare Williams, Stakeholder Engagement Specialist Kim Manahi, Mana Whenua Lik Dawson, Catherine Dawson and baby Taituha, Ngāi Tahu Farming Board Chair Gill Cox. Front row, left, finalist Rod Lamb, Te Ahu Patiki and finalist Hemi Dawson, Maungatere.

Social Return on Investment

The great thinker, Albert Einstein, once said that ‘not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted’.  One of the challenges of Whānau Ora is to help present our stories in a way which demonstrates the impact initiatives are having.

This week Alice Matheson and I spent a couple of days in Wellington understanding better how to apply the awe-inspiring value of Whānau Ora initiatives to a ‘value for money’ approach.  A concept of social return on investment (SROI) has emerged over the last decade in the USA, UK and Australia.  It attempts to create a methodology to recognise the social, environmental and economic impacts of any initiative.  These models, along with Results Based Accountability, and a Value for Money framework, help us to interpret the success that is felt in the heart and seen in the eyes of whānau, into a way in which officials can itemise and quantify.

In the news

 

 

A couple of interesting items struck me this week.   Westpac has  announced a major new community partnership ( can read more about it here.) – a three year pilot programme to improve the health and education levels of 1700 students in Papakura.   The pilot, known as Mana-ā-riki, involves six schools and if successful will be rolled out across Aotearoa.  

 

Nominations for The Governor-General’s Anzac of the Year Award have opened for 2016. . The Award is made by the Governor General for a single act or for significant service to New Zealanders or the international community. The Award recognises those who have demonstrated the qualities we associate with the Anzac spirit: comradeship, compassion, courage and commitment. They are also the qualities that whānau see in abundance, as the heroes and champions that strengthen every home.   If you know of anyone you’d like to nominate, visit www.rsa.org.nz/anzacofyear.

 

Te Pūtahitanga in Te Tauihu

Finally, for all those in Te Tauihu, come along next week to meet our team in action:

 

Monday 29th February 2016

Location:         Whakatū Marae (99 Atawhai Drive, Nelson)

Time:         12.30pm to 2.30pm

 

Wednesday 2nd March 2016

Location:           Waikawa Marae (210 Waikawa Road, Waikawa))

Time:         9am-11am


Our three days in Te Tauihu starts off at the beautiful Titiraukawa at Pelorus Bridge, a cultural redress property of Ngāti Kuia.  From what we have been told, Titiraukawa with “bush enclosed and river nearby, is an absolute gem in the middle of paradise”. Sounds like a wonderful place from which to think about how can we – Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu – be the very best Whānau Ora commissioning agency for all whānau within Te Waipounamu.